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Although the numbers of protesters said to have attended the march range from 1,000 to 3,000 people (Mc Nicol 2012; ‘Toronto’s Slutwalk sparks blogosphere feminism debate’; Onstad 2011), it not only attracted local media attention, but was reported across Canada and the world, fuelling the emergence of this grassroots political movement.News records indicate that marches first began springing up in Canada and the US before moving across the Atlantic to the UK, Australia, Singapore, New Zealand, South Africa and a range of other non- Western and non- English- speaking nations (see also Carr 2013; Dow & Wood 2014).In July 2014 a record breaking 11,000 people turned up to the fourth annual Slut Walk in Reykjavík, Iceland.***The genesis and development of Slut Walk In January 2011, Toronto resident Heather Jarvis was on Facebook when she came across an article from York University’s student newspaper The Excalibur, recounting PC Sanguinetti’s comments about how women could avoid being ‘victimized’ by not dressing like ‘sluts.’ Angered by the perpetuation of rape myths – particularly the idea that women who dress provocatively, drink alcohol, or who enjoy sex, are regularly blamed if sexually assaulted – Jarvis shared the story on Facebook, creating an online dialogue between friends. Error Banner.fade_out.modal_overlay.modal_overlay .modal_wrapper.modal_overlay [email protected](max-width:630px)@media(max-width:630px).modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:hover:before. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner. The idea for the name emerged when Barnett told a colleague about their protest, who jokingly asked if they were going to call it ‘Slut Walk’.

Text is available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license; additional terms may apply.In January 2011, Toronto Police Constable Michael Sanguinetti addressed a small group of York University students on campus safety.Prefaced by the statement ‘I’m told I’m not supposed to say this’ he went on to advise that, ‘women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized’.In one exchange with Sonya Barnett, Jarvis stated she wanted to go to the Toronto police headquarters to share her anger, and was immediately supported.After exchanging a few messages, Jarvis and Barnett agreed to stage a protest.