Dating in other countries

I'm French and I grew up in Bordeaux, in the southwest of the country. Julia: I feel like, in NYC specifically, you ALWAYS have to have the talk. K., I think that it's fine to date several people at once, provided it's still at the early stages and you're not taking the piss.I lived in Paris, in Sweden, and in Washington state for a while. I don't know if it's an American thing or if this is just specific to New York, but the dating scene here often feels like an actual market where people try goods (several at once) and decide which one is best fitted to their needs and expectations. It feels way more organic and spontaneous in France, but that could also just be an illusion. You can find, theoretically, someone and get in the groove of things and just start dating naturally, but the talk still always happens — nothing is ever assumed. The talk is done nevertheless but just to know if you should move on or not. I think if you're dating someone for more than a few weeks, then maybe some clearer "erm, hey, are we making this a thing? British people are too awkward to have an "exclusivity talk" — I almost never hear my friends say they've had to have that talk.The privacy of teenagers’ relationship is noticeable when you walk in Paris streets: You will rarely witness two young people show a lot of affection for each other. The French language doesn’t make a difference between “like” and “love” (the verb for both is ), which makes it very easy to avoid the whole “I love you” drama that exists in America.We keep that for private spaces, or once again, parties. “Je t’aime”/”I love you” is usually pronounced after a month of dating and is not a big deal, even though it makes us happy when said.She dreams of moving to the States to make French culture more known.She could also eat at Chipotle everyday, and watch her favorite shows live, and go to concerts while studying at NYU or UCLA.Although some couples might wear or buy things like this in the U. Gather a group of young and single foreigners who recently moved to New York City and at one moment or another, you'll hear them talk about how weird the dating scene in the city is.

And when we do ask our love interest if he wants to have a relationship, it’s because we already kissed or at least gotten really close. There’s no such thing as DTR (Defining The Relationship) because exclusivity is implied.

So, we decided to gather eight women who work at Buzz Feed and who live in and come from different countries to discuss cultural differences when it comes to love and relationships.

Here they are: Marie Telling: I'm an associate editor for Buzz Feed France, based in New York.

But, once again, if the relationship is going to happen, it’s going to be exclusive.

Furthermore, French teenagers keep their relationships very private.